How to get the best possible Wireless-N speeds...

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bbb_forever
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 29, 2009 22:06    Post subject: How to get the best possible Wireless-N speeds... Reply with quote
How to get the best possible Wireless-N speeds...

Excerpt from:
Seven Troubleshooting Tips for Wireless N Networks:
http://www.ciscopress.com/articles/article.asp?p=1395549

"Remember, what you see is not what you get. The box and marketing materials usually mention the maximum data rates and ranges for the wireless standards. The realistic values will be much less.

For example, you'll probably only get up to around 100Mbps of true throughput instead of the touted rates around 300Mbps. Windows also lies; it shows you the standardized data rates rather than the true values. You have to use other throughput testing programs to get a realistic value.

1. #1 Confirm that You're Using New Adapters
2. #2 Verify that Hardware is from the Same Manufacturer
3. #3 Use WPA2-AES Encryption Only
4. #4 Change Default Channel-width for High Speeds
5. #5 Disconnect Wireless G Clients for Best N Performance
6. #6 Use Only 40MHz-wide Channels with Strong Signals
7. #7 Check for interference"

Go read the full article (weblink near the top) to set your expectations properly if you want to achieve Wireless-N speeds.


Last edited by bbb_forever on Mon Jun 28, 2010 4:59; edited 14 times in total
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slaveunit
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 29, 2009 22:09    Post subject: Reply with quote
Good post. May help many out.
bbb_forever
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Joined: 10 Oct 2009
Posts: 202

PostPosted: Fri Oct 30, 2009 0:16    Post subject: Reply with quote
Another requirement to reach 300 Mbps Speed on your 802.11n Network.

The article covers the topic of enabling Channel Bonding in order to increase bandwidth and the connected speed.

http://compnetworking.about.com/od/wireless/f/80211n-300-mbps.htm

"Interference from other 802.11n networks nearby can prevent a Wireless N router from sustaining channel bonded connections. In fact, some Wireless N routers automatically fall back to single channel operation when they detect wireless interference on the channels.

As with other networking standards, applications running on an 802.11n network will typically see substantially less actual bandwidth than the rated maximums imply even with channel bonding in place. A 300 Mbps rated 802.11n connection will often yield 200 Mbps or less of user data throughput."


Last edited by bbb_forever on Sat Jun 12, 2010 16:45; edited 4 times in total
bbb_forever
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Joined: 10 Oct 2009
Posts: 202

PostPosted: Sat Oct 31, 2009 13:59    Post subject: Reply with quote
Real-world tests of 802.11n technology

From:
http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/networking/?p=232

"Real-world Speed of Wireless-G:
Specifically, 802.11g products, which have a theoretical maximum throughput speed of 54Mbit/sec., typically provide real-world speeds of 22Mbit/sec. to 24Mbit/sec.

Real-world Speed of Wireless-N:
In contrast, Intel says it's seeing real-world speeds of 100Mbit/sec. to 140Mbit/sec. for 802.11n equipment. Those results were confirmed in a recent Computerworld roundup review of several Wi-Fi products based on Draft 2 of the 802.11n standard.

[Note: I think this 100-140Mbps speed is from Enterprise-grade Wi-Fi routers, NOT FROM home-consumer-grade routers, which are usually way less than 100Mbps. -bbb_forever]

Range:
Range is harder to quantify because it's affected by many variables, such as barriers that could block the signal. However, Intel reports that 802.11n equipment typically delivers more than twice the range of 802.11g equipment, at any given throughput speed. Those results were confirmed anecdotally in the recent Computerworld review."


Last edited by bbb_forever on Sat Jun 12, 2010 16:46; edited 4 times in total
bbb_forever
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Joined: 10 Oct 2009
Posts: 202

PostPosted: Wed Nov 11, 2009 4:11    Post subject: Reply with quote
If you want to download some free tools to test data throughput on your network, go to this thread:
http://www.dd-wrt.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=60511

=========================================================

Do NOT add your speed problems here.
Please don't thread-jack.

If you have a speed issue/problem, create your own thread with router model # and adapter model # in the appropriate forum section.

I would like to keep this thread clean for speed improvement recommendations.

Thanks.


Last edited by bbb_forever on Sat Jun 12, 2010 16:49; edited 4 times in total
bbb_forever
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Joined: 10 Oct 2009
Posts: 202

PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 8:51    Post subject: Reply with quote
Related readings:

Read the "Basic configuration" and "Wireless Security" sections in this tutorial:
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless-N_Configuration

"Wireless Security:
You cannot use TKIP and still get N-speeds. You MUST use AES security or none at all."

In other words, you have to set and enable a WPA2 with AES security password on the router and the client device.


Last edited by bbb_forever on Mon Aug 09, 2010 15:35; edited 1 time in total
bbb_forever
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Joined: 10 Oct 2009
Posts: 202

PostPosted: Sun Jun 27, 2010 10:28    Post subject: Reply with quote
5 Ways To Fix Slow 802.11n Speed:
http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless/wireless-basics/30664-5-ways-to-fix-slow-80211n-speed

I agree with Fix #1-#4.

But Fix #5 is up for debate, depending on your particular set-up.

I found that Channel-Bonding helped get my connection link rate to 300Mbps in a strong signal presence.
bbb_forever
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Joined: 10 Oct 2009
Posts: 202

PostPosted: Mon Jun 28, 2010 3:37    Post subject: Reply with quote
When Wireless LANs Collide: How To Beat The Wireless Crowd :
http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless/wireless-howto/31190-when-wireless-lans-collide-how-to-beat-the-wireless-crowd

Excerpt:
"An 802.11g network has a best-case useable bandwidth of around 25Mbps. 802.11n can move this up to anywhere between 50 and 100 Mbps. But if any 11g clients are also actively using the same radio on an 802.11n router, throughput for both will be reduced by more than half."
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