QNAP QTS vs dd-wrt

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eginnc
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 23 Jul 2017
Posts: 49

PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2019 2:30    Post subject: QNAP QTS vs dd-wrt Reply with quote
This is not, strictly speaking, a general question. Rather, a shout out for dd-wrt.

I recently added a QNAP TS-228A to the home network: Realtek 1295 4 core 1.4 GHZ SoC, 1 GB DDR4 ram. Impressive hardware specs compared to most routers. The plan was to plug in my Canon inkjet and use it as print server, a NAS (of course), DLNA server (of course), and get faster transfer speeds than my Archer C9 running dd-wrt on all of 128MB of ram with an ext4 formatted WD 4TB MyBook plugged into it.

Well, I got the faster transfer speeds and RAID 1. But the QNAP DLNA server interface decided for me that I wanted a half dozen virtual organization folders to divvy up my music, video and picture collection. dd-wrt understood I organized them into folders I wanted for a reason already! And mapping users to NAS share folders was quite frankly a bit clunky compared to dd-wrt.

I'm keeping the QNAP (for NAS - my WAPs are dd-wrt all the way!) - it's about 2x to 3x faster on transfers than my lowly Archer C9 running a NAS with dd-wrt. That goal was at least achieved. And the backup features are nice. But you know what? That's about its only advantage. dd-wrt was (and is) simple, elegant, did what I needed, presented a better (less complicated) interface to my home network for DLNA and Samba, worked well, and all on incredibly low capability hardware compared to the QNAP NAS no less!

Oh yeah, and my printer server? QNAP QTS couldn't even recognize my printer (neither from Windows 10 nor from Manjaro). So I plugged it back into my Archer C9 flashed with dd-wrt and it works great again.

Overall, I was underwhelmed with the QNAP NAS, because dd-wrt had spoiled me w.r.t. what I should expect. When one ponders the wide disparity in hardware capability and corporate support, the capability dd-wrt delivers is just amazing.

Thank you for some truly great work!

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d0ug
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Joined: 31 Jul 2015
Posts: 760

PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2019 20:53    Post subject: Re: QNAP QTS vs dd-wrt Reply with quote
eginnc wrote:
This is not, strictly speaking, a general question. Rather, a shout out for dd-wrt.

I recently added a QNAP TS-228A to the home network: Realtek 1295 4 core 1.4 GHZ SoC, 1 GB DDR4 ram. Impressive hardware specs compared to most routers. The plan was to plug in my Canon inkjet and use it as print server, a NAS (of course), DLNA server (of course), and get faster transfer speeds than my Archer C9 running dd-wrt on all of 128MB of ram with an ext4 formatted WD 4TB MyBook plugged into it.

Well, I got the faster transfer speeds and RAID 1. But the QNAP DLNA server interface decided for me that I wanted a half dozen virtual organization folders to divvy up my music, video and picture collection. dd-wrt understood I organized them into folders I wanted for a reason already! And mapping users to NAS share folders was quite frankly a bit clunky compared to dd-wrt.

I'm keeping the QNAP (for NAS - my WAPs are dd-wrt all the way!) - it's about 2x to 3x faster on transfers than my lowly Archer C9 running a NAS with dd-wrt. That goal was at least achieved. And the backup features are nice. But you know what? That's about its only advantage. dd-wrt was (and is) simple, elegant, did what I needed, presented a better (less complicated) interface to my home network for DLNA and Samba, worked well, and all on incredibly low capability hardware compared to the QNAP NAS no less!

Oh yeah, and my printer server? QNAP QTS couldn't even recognize my printer (neither from Windows 10 nor from Manjaro). So I plugged it back into my Archer C9 flashed with dd-wrt and it works great again.

Overall, I was underwhelmed with the QNAP NAS, because dd-wrt had spoiled me w.r.t. what I should expect. When one ponders the wide disparity in hardware capability and corporate support, the capability dd-wrt delivers is just amazing.

Thank you for some truly great work!


A QNAP is far better hardware for a NAS than a janky setup with external HDs and a DD-WRT router. However you have seen the bad part of these entry level dedicated NASes. They are aimed at the SOHO market for the clueless, or bare minimum "tech enthusiasts" users to be able setup and use.

There are alternate firmwares like FreeNAS that can be setup on these. Never tried it myself though.

I have a QNAP as well but only use it for SMB shares and NFS mounts for the storage pool of my 4 node ESXi home lab and the rsyncing to an identically configured 2nd NAS.

Seen far too many incidents with failing disks or corrupted raid arrays to not completely mirror my data on a completely separate device. The plan is to eventually move the 2nd NAS offsite to a family member's house about an hour away and do the nightly rsyncing over VPN to protect against other disasters like fire, burglary, or a natural disaster. Have already tested that and it does work. Setup the OpenVPN client in the QNAP to connect to the OpenVPN server running on DDWRT. Obviously a lot slower over the internet, limited to the upload speed of both sides, but trickling the data to the mirror isn't a problem for me. If the primary NAS fails I can just go to the remote location and pick up the mirror NAS and bring it home to rebuild.
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